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Fireworks in Texas

Wednesday, June 24, was the first day of the 4th of July fireworks sales season. State law permits firework sales only during certain periods of the year, one of which is from June 24 through midnight July 4.  
 
Here are some helpful resources related to fireworks:
 
State laws and regulations:
Additional resources:
 
During the 84th Legislative Session (2015), there were three bills that passed that were related to fireworks. All three go into effect on 9/1/2015.  
  • HB 1150: Relating to the sale of fireworks on and before certain holidays; affecting a provision subject to a criminal penalty.
  • SB 570: Relating to the use of fireworks at certain Texas Department of Transportation rest areas; creating a criminal offense.
  • SB 761: Relating to the taxation of fireworks.
Cover image by flickr user bayasaa.
 

Bill Effective Dates

The library reviews the text of all bills that become law to determine their effective dates, and enters the information into the Texas Legislature Online (TLO). To find the effective date of a bill, lookup the bill in TLO and check the "Last action" field in the history window. In some cases, different sections of a bill may have different effective dates, in which case additional remarks will be given to provide the information.
 
For House and Senate bills from the 84th Regular Session (2015), the two largest groupings are:
  • Effective immediately: 499
  • Effective on 9/1/15: 679
There are also 4 bills from the 83rd Regular Session (2013) that become effective 9/1/2015.
 
The library compiles a more detailed list of bills and their effective dates following each regular and called session. The list is made available on the library's website once it is complete.

Week in Review, June 25th

In this weekly post, we feature online articles and policy reports published recently, and other helpful research tools.
  • Read about a national Medicare fraud takedown. (U.S. Department of Justice, June 18, 2015)
  • Consider emergency savings and how earnings affects an individual's ability to save. (Bankrate, June 23, 2015)
  • Take a look at state and local tax revenue estimates for the first quarter of 2015. (U.S. Census Bureau, June 23, 2015)
  • Review the 2013 American Housing Survey factsheets for select metropolitan areas, including the Austin–Round Rock, Houston, and San Antonio areas. (U.S. Census Bureau, June 2015)
  • Explore the results of a study about the number of obese and overweight Americans. (Los Angeles Times, June 22, 2015)
 
 

Bill Statistics for the 84th R.S.

June 21 was the last day the Governor could sign, veto, or allow to become law without his signature bills presented to him less than 10 days (not counting Sundays) prior to final adjournment of the 84th Regular Session.
 
The following bill statistics were calculated on June 23 at 11:15 a.m.
  • To see how these statistics have changed since last week, please view our blog post from June 17
  • To learn about session law chapter numbers and copies of signed bills, please view our blog post from June 10.
 
House and Senate Bills
Filed 6,276
Sent to the Governor 1,323
Signed by the Governor 1,117
Signed by the Governor w/line-item veto 2
Vetoed by the Governor 41
Filed without the Governor's signature 163
House and Senate Joint Resolutions
Filed 200
Filed with the Secretary of State 7
House and Senate Concurrent Resolutions
Filed 174
Filed with the Secretary of State 15
Sent to the Governor 85
Signed by the Governor 84
Vetoed by the Governor 1
 

Week in Review, June 18th

In this weekly post, we feature online articles and policy reports published recently, and other helpful research tools.
  • Explore the 50-state scorecard to see how Texas ranks among the states. (Texas Comptroller of Public Accounts, June 2015)
  • Track the number of heatstroke deaths of children left in cars. (Department of Meteorology & Climate Science, San Jose State University, updated June 17, 2015)
  • Read about how FEMA is reforming the National Flood Insurance Program claims and appeals process. (Federal Emergency Management Agency, June 5, 2015)
  • Review the FDA's ban of industrially produced trans fat in food intended for human consumption. (Food and Drug Administration, June 17, 2015)
 
 

Bill Statistics, June 17th

June 21 is the last day the Governor can sign, veto, or allow to become law without his signature bills presented to him less than 10 days (not counting Sundays) prior to final adjournment of the 84th Regular Session.
 
The following bill statistics were calculated on June 17 at 9:15 a.m. To see how these statistics have changed since last week, and to learn about session law chapter numbers and copies of signed bills, please view our blog post from June 10.
 
House and Senate Bills
Filed 6,276
Sent to the Governor 1,323
Signed by the Governor 587
Vetoed by the Governor 4
Filed without the Governor's signature 60
House and Senate Joint Resolutions
Filed 200
Filed with the Secretary of State 7
House and Senate Concurrent Resolutions
Filed 174
Filed with the Secretary of State 15
Sent to the Governor 85
Signed by the Governor 46
Vetoed by the Governor 1
 

Week in Review, June 11th

In this weekly post, we feature online articles and policy reports published recently, and other helpful research tools.
  • Explore the EPA's study on hydraulic fracturing. (U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, June 4, 2015)
  • Consider the effects of state Medicaid expansion. (Executive Office of the President, Council of Economic Advisers / The White House, June 2015)
  • Read about how Texas paid for millions in unapproved Medicaid orthodontic services. (Office of Inspector General, U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, June 2015)
  • Get the numbers on executive compensation at public and private colleges state by state. (The Chronicle of Higher Education, June 8, 2015)
  • Learn ways to prevent melanoma. (Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, June 2015)
 
 

84th R.S. Bill Statistics and FAQs

House and Senate Bills
Filed 6,276
Sent to the Governor 1,323
Signed by the Governor 355
Vetoed by the Governor 4
Filed without the Governor's signature 20
House and Senate Joint Resolutions
Filed 200
Filed with the Secretary of State 7
House and Senate Concurrent Resolutions
Filed 174
Filed with the Secretary of State 15
Sent to the Governor 85
Signed by the Governor 33
Vetoed by the Governor 1
 
What happens now?
The 84th Regular Session ended June 1, 2015. Bills that passed both the House and the Senate were sent to the Governor for him to sign, veto, or allow to become law without his signature. Joint Resolutions that passed both chambers of the Legislature were filed with the Secretary of State, and will be on the ballot for the November 3, 2015 election.
 
How much time does the Governor have to act on a bill?
If a bill is sent to the Governor during the legislative session, the Governor has 10 days (not counting Sundays) to sign the bill or return the bill to the Legislature with objection. If after 10 days the bill is not returned to the Legislature by the Governor with objections or he has not yet signed it, the bill becomes law as if the Governor had signed it.
 
If the Legislature has adjourned sine die, or if the bill is presented to the Governor less than 10 days (not counting Sundays) prior to final adjournment, the Governor has 20 days (counting Sundays) after the final day of the session to sign or veto the bill. If neither action is taken, the bill becomes law without the Governor's signature (Texas Const. art. IV, § 14).
 
Sunday, June 21, is the 20th day following final adjournment of the 84th Regular Session. It is the last day the Governor can sign or veto  bills passed during the 84th Regular Session. To view veto proclamations issued by Governor Abbott for the 84th Regular Session, please visit the library's Vetoed Bills page.
 
Bill Effective Dates
The library reviews the text of all bills that become law to determine their effective dates, and enters the information into the Texas Legislature Online. To find the effective date of a bill, check the "Last action" field on the bill's main page. In some cases, different sections of a bill may have different effective dates, in which case remarks will be given to provide the information.
 
In addition to updating the Texas Legislature Online with effective date information, the library compiles a list of bills and their effective dates following each regular and called session. The list is made available on the library's website once it is complete.
 
Signed Copies of Bills
Bills that the Governor signed or allowed to become law without his signature are sent to the Secretary of State's office, where they are made available online on the Bills and Resolutions page.
 
You can determine whether a bill sent to the Governor was signed or filed without signature by checking the bill in the Texas Legislature Online. If the bill passed but was filed without signature, you will see the action "Filed without the Governor's signature."
 
Session Law Chapter Numbers
The Secretary of State's Bills and Resolutions page also lists the session law chapter number that is assigned to each bill that has become law. The session laws contain the text of all bills passed into law during a particular legislative session. Chapter numbers are used primarily for citing a bill in a legislative history annotation.

Week in Review, June 4th

In this weekly post, we feature online articles and policy reports published recently, and other helpful research tools.
  • Consider how Millennials get their news. (Pew Research Center, June 1, 2015)
  • Examine per-pupil spending state by state for 2013. (U.S. Census Bureau, June 2, 2015)
  • Explore the economic impact of El Niño. (Federal Reserve Bank of Dallas, May 2015)
  • Read about how Israel employs desalination and wastewater recycling to overcome drought. (The New York Times, May 29, 2015)
 
 
 

Conference Committee Reports and Bill Statistics

The 84th Regular Session ends Monday, June 1. As the end of session nears, House and Senate members are meeting in conference committees to resolve differences between their versions of bills. For information on the conference committee process, please see How a Bill Becomes Law and Guide to Texas Legislative Information.
 
To see a list of bills still in conference committee, please click here. The members of a bill's conference committee are listed in Texas Legislature Online, and can be viewed by searching on the bill. For instructions on searching in TLO, please see the TLO Help section.
 
The below chart provides a snapshot of bill statistics as of 11:30 am today.
 
 
 

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