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Bill Statistics, July 24

 

 

Bill statistics for the period of July 10, 2017 - July 23, 2017 are provided below. 

 

  House Bills (HB) & Joint Resolutions (HJR) Senate Bills (SB) & Joint Resolutions (SJR)
Filed  293 113
Reported out of committee 1 18
Passed by chamber of origin 0 2
Referred to committee in opposite chamber 0 0
Reported out of committee in opposite chamber 0 0
Passed opposite chamber 0 0
Sent to the Governor (bills only) 0 0
Signed by the Governor (bills only) 0 0

 

For more information about special sessions, visit our Special Sessions of the Texas Legislature page.

Bill Effective Dates, 85th Legislature

On September 1, 2017, provisions of 673 bills passed during the regular session of the 85th Legislature will take effect.

 

Additionally, sections of bills passed during the 84th Legislature83rd Legislature, and 82nd 1st C.S. will take effect on September 1.

 

To keep up with new laws throughout the year, check the Library's list of bill effective dates.

 

Bill Statistics End-of-Session Comparison

Interested in how the final results of the 85th Legislature's regular session compares to the past few sessions? Use the charts below to compare and contrast.

 

To see past bill statistics and other session information, see previous blog posts on the legislative process.

 

Locating Bill Effective Dates on TLO

The library reviews the text of all bills that become law to determine their effective dates and enters the information into Texas Legislature Online (TLO). To find the effective date of a bill, look up the bill in TLO and check the "Last action" field in the history window. In some cases, different sections of a bill may have different effective dates, in which case additional remarks will be given to provide the information.

 

For House and Senate bills from the 85th Regular Session (2017), the two largest groupings are:

  • Effective immediately: 397
  • Effective on 9/1/17: 673

The library compiles a more detailed list of bills and their effective dates following each regular and called session. The list is made available on the library's website once it is complete.

Bill Statistics after Signing/Veto Period

June 18 was the last day the Governor could sign, veto, or allow to become law without his signature bills presented to him less than 10 days (not counting Sundays) prior to final adjournment of the 85th Regular Session.

 

The following bill statistics were calculated on June 20 at 8:15 a.m.

  • To see how these statistics have changed since last week, please view our blog post from June 12.
  • To learn about session law chapter numbers and copies of signed bills, please view our blog post from June 5.

 

House and Senate Bills
Filed 6,631
Sent to the Governor 1,211
Signed by the Governor 1,007
Signed by the Governor w/ line-item veto 1
Vetoed by the Governor 50
Filed without the Governor's signature 153
House and Senate Joint Resolutions
Filed 169
Filed with the Secretary of State 9
House and Senate Concurrent Resolutions
Filed 202
Filed with the Secretary of State 13
Sent to the Governor 84
Signed by the Governor 83
Vetoed by the Governor 0
Filed without the Governor's signature 1

 

Bill Statistics, Two Weeks after Sine Die

June 18 is the last day the Governor can sign, veto, or allow to become law without his signature bills presented to him less than 10 days (not counting Sundays) prior to final adjournment of the 85th Regular Session.

 

The following bill statistics were calculated on June 12 at 8:45 a.m. To see how these statistics have changed and other post-session information, see previous blog posts on the legislative process.

 

 

85th Legislature Statistics

House and Senate Bills
Filed 6,631
Sent to the Governor 1,211
Signed by the Governor 558
Vetoed by the Governor 0
Filed without the Governor's signature 46
House and Senate Joint Resolutions
Filed 169
Filed with the Secretary of State 9
House and Senate Concurrent Resolutions
Filed 202
Filed with the Secretary of State 13
Sent to the Governor 84
Signed by the Governor 43
Vetoed by the Governor 0

 

Finding Signed Copies of Bills and Session Law Chapter Numbers

Looking for signed copies of bills, or trying to determine in what session law chapter a bill can be found? Here are some tips.

Signed copies of bills

Bills that the Governor signed or allowed to become law without his signature are sent to the Secretary of State's office, where they will be made available online on the Bills and Resolutions page. The signing deadline for the 85th Legislature is Sunday, June 18.

You can determine whether a bill sent to the Governor was signed or filed without signature by checking the bill in the Texas Legislature Online. If the bill passed but was filed without signature, you will see the action "Filed without the Governor's signature."

Signed copies from the 78th - 84th Legislatures are available online at the University of North Texas Laws and Resolutions Archive. Copies of signed bills older than the 78th Regular Session are available through the Texas State Archives. Please call (512) 463-5480.

 

Session law chapter numbers

The Secretary of State's Bills and Resolutions page also lists the session law chapter number that is assigned to each bill that has become law. The session laws contain the text of all bills passed into law during a particular legislative session. Chapter numbers are used primarily for citing a bill in a legislative history annotation.

For questions about bill/chapter numbers for bills from the 85th R.S., please contact the Secretary of State's office at (512) 463-5561.

Session law chapter citations for previous sessions are available online through the Legislative Archive System. To view the complete bill/session law chapter cross reference table for a session, select the legislature in the "search by session law chapter" option and leave the chapter box blank. The LRL will be working to add these records for the 85th regular session.

Bill Statistics, May 31

These statistics were pulled on May 31 at 11:30 a.m. The numbers will continue to change as the governor takes action on these bills and resolutions. We will post occasional updates in the coming weeks. See our bill statistics page to compare these numbers with historical statistics.

 

House and Senate Bills
Filed 6,631
Sent to the Governor 1,208
Signed by the Governor 286
Vetoed by the Governor 0
Filed without the Governor's signature 28
House and Senate Joint Resolutions
Filed 169
Filed with the Secretary of State 9
House and Senate Concurrent Resolutions
Filed 202
Filed with the Secretary of State 13
Sent to the Governor 84
Signed by the Governor 42
Vetoed by the Governor 0

 

What's Next? Post-Session FAQ and Bill Statistics

House and Senate Bills
Filed 6,631
Sent to the Governor 824
Signed by the Governor 190
Vetoed by the Governor 0
Filed without the Governor's signature 16
House and Senate Joint Resolutions
Filed 169
Filed with the Secretary of State 7
House and Senate Concurrent Resolutions
Filed 202
Filed with the Secretary of State 11
Sent to the Governor 50
Signed by the Governor 37
Vetoed by the Governor 0

*Statistics as of May 30 at 8:30 a.m. See our bill statistics page to compare these numbers with historical statistics.

 

What happens now?

The 85th Regular Session ended May 29, 2017. Bills that passed both the House and the Senate were sent to the Governor for him to sign, veto, or allow to become law without his signature. Joint Resolutions that passed both chambers of the Legislature were filed with the Secretary of State, and those that propose amendments to the Texas Constitution will be on the ballot for the November 7, 2017 election.

 

If the Legislature passes a bill, does it become a law right away?

No. Under Article 4, Section 14 of the Texas Constitution, bills passed by the Legislature must be submitted to the Governor for approval. The Governor can sign a bill, veto it, line-item veto an appropriation, or allow a bill to become law without his signature.

 

How much time does the Governor have to act on a bill?

If a bill is sent to the Governor during the legislative session, the Governor has 10 days (not counting Sundays) to sign the bill or return the bill to the Legislature with objection. If after 10 days the bill is not returned to the Legislature by the Governor with objections or he has not yet signed it, the bill becomes law as if the Governor had signed it.

 

If the Legislature has adjourned sine die, or if the bill is presented to the Governor less than 10 days (not counting Sundays) prior to final adjournment, the Governor has 20 days (counting Sundays) after the final day of the session to sign or veto the bill. If neither action is taken, the bill becomes law without the Governor's signature (Texas Const. art. IV, § 14).

 

Sunday, June 18, is the 20th day following final adjournment of the 85th Regular Session. It is the last day the Governor can sign or veto bills passed during the 85th Regular Session. The LRL's vetoes database will be updated for the 85th Regular Session as we receive those documents.

 

What happens to bills that did not pass?

Bills that did not make it completely through the legislative process die with the end of the session and are not automatically reintroduced during the next session.

 

Where can I find more information about special sessions?

You can start with the LRL's FAQ about special sessions. The LRL website's section devoted to special sessions also includes historical information, links to statutory authority pertaining to special sessions, and more.

 

Conference Committee Reports and Bill Statistics

The 85th Regular Session ends Monday, May 29. As the end of session nears, many House and Senate members have been appointed to conference committees to resolve differences between their versions of bills. For information on the conference committee process, please see The Legislative Process in Texas and Texas Legislative Information and Resources.

 

To see a list of bills for which a conference committee was requested, please click here. Upon receiving completed conference committee reports, the LRL scans and posts them in our conference committee reports database. These reports, as well as a list of the members of a bill's conference committee, also are listed in the Texas Legislature Online record for each bill. 

 

The below chart provides a snapshot of bill statistics as of 11:30 am today.

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